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The Moon sets behind the temple of Poseidon at Sounio 

(via baringtheaegis)

Source: greeksky.gr
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graveyarddirt:

Veiling of Religious Images (via Wikipedia)

01. A veiled altar cross at an Anglican cathedral in St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, Memphis, Tennessee.

02. A crucifix on the high altar is veiled for Lent. Saint Martin’s parish, Württemberg, Germany.

03. A Roman Catholic residential home altar of Our Lady of Fatima veiled for Ash Wednesday. With silver candlesticks prepared and no flowers.

In certain pious Catholic countries prior to the Second Vatican Council, religious objects were veiled for the entire forty-days of Lent. Though perhaps uncommon in the United States of America, this pious practice is consistently observed in Malaga, Seville and Barcelona, Spain, as well as in Malta, Goa, India, Peru and the Philippine islands (with the exception on processional images). In Ireland prior to Vatican II, when impoverished rural Catholic convents and parishes could not afford purple fabrics, they resorted to either removing the statues altogether, or if too heavy or bothersome; turned the statues to face the wall. As is popular custom, the 14 Stations of the Cross plaques on the walls are not veiled.

Former crucifixes made before the time of Saint Francis of Assisi did not have a body corpus, therefore adorned with jewels and gemstones which was referred to as Crux Gemmatae. In order to keep the faithful from adoring the Crucifixes elaborated with ornamentation, veiling it in royal purple fabrics came into place. The violet colour later evolved as a color of penance and mourning.

Further liturgical changes in modernity reduced it to the last week of Passiontide. In cases where no violet fabrics could be afford by the parish, only the heads of the statues were veiled. If there were no fabrics afforded at all, the religious statues and images were turned around facing the wall and flowers were always removed as a sign of solemn mourning. In pre-1970 forms of the Roman Rite, the last two weeks of Lent are known as Passiontide, a period beginning on the Fifth Sunday in Lent, which in the 1962 edition of the Roman Missal is called the First Sunday in Passiontide and in earlier editions Passion Sunday. All statues (and in England paintings as well) in the church were traditionally veiled in violet. This was seen as in keeping with the Gospel of that Sunday (John 8:46–59), in which Jesus “hid himself” from the people. In pious Catholic countries such as Spain and the Philippines, cultural adage sayings among the faithful cite that “God is dead" on the eve of Good Friday.

Due to the lack of piety and ornate Catholic artwork by general within the United States of America after the Second Vatican Council, the need to veil statues or crosses became increasingly irrelevant and deemed unnecessary by various diocesan bishops. As a result, the veils were removed at the singing of the Gloria during the Easter Vigil. In 1970 the name “Passiontide” was dropped, although the last two weeks are markedly different from the rest of the season, and continuance of the tradition of veiling images is left to the decision of a country’s conference of bishops or even to individual parishes as pastors may wish.

(via graveyarddirt)

Source: Wikipedia
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deadguy95:

G spot? Oh you mean gamestop hah yeah i know where that is

(via dawnadaybreak)

Source: deadguy95
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dduane:

acathal:

I saw a thing like this with the 50 states and the counties of England so I did the counties of Ireland.

Thank you for that! :)

(via adamthenorman)

Source: acathal
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ask-usedkirby:

“Money Can’t Buy You Happiness, But Money Can Buy You A Baby Goat, Which Is A Ball Of Happiness”   ~Phillard Von Chester 

Have fun looking at baby goats and hope your day gets better!

(via adamthenorman)

Source: ask-usedkirby
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pr1nceshawn:

Tohoku Kids and Adults enjoy their dream ride on Pokemon Train.

As Tohoku was devastatingly affected by a 2011 tsunami, this train offers people who are still dealing with the aftermath an escape from their troubles, even if it’s just for awhile. The locomotive is called the ‘Pokemon with YOU train’ and travels between Narutō and Chōshi.

(via dawnadaybreak)

Source: en.rocketnews24.com
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maisiewilliams:

if only?? notre dame was real?????

(via peaceful-peach-elephants)

Source: maisiewilliams